Worth the Weight November 13 2012

Proper water-to-coffee ratios is very important to creating a great cup of coffee. I've found that using weight to brew coffee offers consistent accuracy. I weigh both the grounds & water when brewing. I know that sounds like a lot, but it's really easy with the help of decent kitchen scale. I don't use volume measurements because there is so much variability. I give you the coffee scoop:
Coffee Scoops   
These are 4 coffee scoops that I've collected over the years. Below each scoop is the approximate weight in grams that each scoop holds. As you can see, these commony used coffee scoops range from 6 grams to 20 grams. That makes a huge difference when trying to nail the right amount for your brew. When I'm asked, "how many scoops" I honestly have to guess because I just don't know what size scoop my customer is using.  To deconstruct this even further, the roast degree affects weight as well. A scoop full of light roast coffee weighs more than a scoop of French Roast. Dark roasted beans expand more due to carmelization during the roasting process, but are less dense than their lighter counterparts. Darker beans take up more space, but weigh less. In conclusion, simply consider investing in a good digital kitchen scale. They are very inexpensive & once you start using them, they are invaluable. I use ours to make coffee & for recipes in the kitchen. I don't know about you, but I just feel more confident about the outcome of a dish when I've taken measures to reduce error. Worth the weight? I absolutely think so. Be blessed.